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6 Most Dangerous Toys Of The 80s


In the previous post we looked at the most dangerous toys of this year. Now here's a look back to the danger that was the toys of the 80's!

 

6. The Pogo-Ball - Hasbro, taking this concept to heart, decided to take an already dangerous toy concept— the pogo stick — and attach a ball to the bottom while getting rid of the handlebars.
 
5. Metal Playgrounds – everything is plastic now. Back in their 80s heyday though, playgrounds with metal slides, jungle gyms, and teeter-totters were everywhere. There was nothing quite like riding down a big metal slide, with its surface heated to inferno-like levels by the afternoon sun, and jagged edges offering fresh cuts as you whizzed by.
 
4. Slap Bracelets - Since they were made of metal however, prolonged wear and tear led the metal to come through the outer casing and many schools banned the bracelets after finding children were being hurt by this defect.
 
3. Wham-O Slip N’ Slide - Due to multiple reports of injuries during the 1970s and 80s, the Consumer Product Safety Commission put out a recommendation that only children should use the products.
 
2. Hang 10 Mini Hammocks - EZ Sales had this idea, but unwittingly released a “death cocoon” upon an unsuspecting public. At least 12 children died of asphyxiation before the products were eventually recalled in 1996.
 
1. Jarts - No right-minded parent would let their kids play with darts unsupervised. However, if the darts are marketed towards children, it must mean they’re safe to use, right? Lawn darts, or “Jarts”, were popular in the 70s and 80s, but due to the fact that they were practically weapons, over 6,1000 people were reportedly injured over an 8 year period, with at least 4 reported deaths. Jarts were eventually forbidden from being marketed to children, but after an 11 year old girl in Tennessee was sent into a coma after being hit by one, they were outright banned in 1988. Jarts are still sold in Canada, but they now have plastic tips instead of metal ones.
 
 
Read more HERE.



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